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NEW ZEALAND

A world-class education and an unforgettable adventure

New Zealand is one of the world’s best places to live and study. Discover our internationally-renowned education system and unbeatable lifestyle.

SAFE AND WELCOMING NZ IS RANKED THE SECOND MOST PEACEFUL NATION ON EARTH.

Where could you live

New Zealand’s relaxed pace of life gives you the time to enjoy everything our vibrant modern cities have to offer. Enjoy live music, theatre, film, dance, free festivals or international sports fixtures, or hang out with your new friends at a cafe, restaurant or bar.

Most of our cities and towns are relatively small and uncrowded, making your daily commute easier and faster than back home. Wherever you live, you won’t be far from beaches, parks, walking trails and cycle tracks.


What would daily life be like?

The size of the UK or Japan but with a population of only 4.6 million people, New Zealand gives you room to breathe and the space to be be yourself.

New Zealand consistently leads world quality of life studies, and we have a great work- life balance. Kiwis believe in balancing a good day’s work or study with time after work and on the weekends to catch up with family and friends, enjoy hobbies and explore nature.


Choose your adventure!

Each day is a new adventure in New Zealand. Explore native forests, snow- capped mountains, white sandy beaches, picture-perfect lakes and stunning fjords - all without the crowds and queues you’ll find in most parts of the world.

There’s something for everyone in New Zealand, whether you enjoy high- adrenalin sports like bungy jumping, skydiving or jet boating, or prefer to get closer to nature by hiking or cycling. You’ll be able to experience our unique Māori culture and see the landscapes made famous by the Lord of the Rings and Hobbit film trilogies.

Working while you study.

BENEFITS OF PART TIME WORK

Working while studying can be a good way to gain New Zealand work experience and help support you while you’re studying abroad.

Gaining experience of a New Zealand workplace also helps you develop skills such as communication, teamwork, timekeeping, interpersonal skills and workplace-relevant English language skills.

Balance your work hours with your study obligations, so your academic performance isn’t compromised, and remember that some scholarships set limits on the number of hours you can work.


WORK OPPORTUNITY

New Zealand has a wide range of industries that offer part-time and casual work.

Some educational institutions also offer students part-time work teaching, tutoring or carrying out administration duties.

Paid internships are a way of gaining industry experience and networking with people in your field of study. Carrying out voluntary work in New Zealand can also be a great addition to your CV, giving you useful experience of the New Zealand workplace.

FINDING WORK

Student Job Search is an organisation set up to help students find work and gain job experience.

Your educational institution may also offer students assistance to learn job- related skills such as writing CVs and preparing for an interview. Seasonal work can be a good way to earn extra money over the holidays and gain new skills.

If you have worked in your home country, it may be helpful to ask your employer for a written reference that you could show to a potential New Zealand employer.


EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS

International students have the same legal minimum rights and entitlements as anyone else working in New Zealand.

These include your right to be paid at least the minimum wage, paid annual and public holidays, and rest breaks.


If you have a Student Visa you may be able to work

   Up to 20 hours a week during term time

   Full-time during scheduled holidays


If you are a Masters by research or PhD student, you may work full-time.


To check whether you’re able to work while studying, visit Immigration New Zealand's website.

Accommodation

New students always feel at home here.

You’ll need somewhere to live while you study, and there are plenty of options available. From apartments in the city to homestays in the countryside, you’ll find something that suits you and your lifestyle.


Halls of residence (or hostels)


Usually just a walk away from campus, halls of residence offer fully furnished single or twin-share rooms with a shared dining hall, lounge and laundry. Meals are often included and you’ll find a lively programme of social activities. A number of the larger institutions also provide private hostels that run in a similar way, and some have self-contained apartments (which we call ‘flats’).


Homestay (or private board)


With a homestay you live with a New Zealand family in their home, usually in a fully furnished room of your own. They’ll provide you with meals and help you to settle in to day-to- day life in New Zealand. A homestay is a great way to get to know some friendly New Zealanders, develop your English skills and get a close-up look at New Zealand’s way of life and culture.


Flatting/Independent Accommodation


Flats range from one-bedroom apartments to four or five bedroom homes, and can be found just about anywhere – close to cities and campuses or further out in the surrounding suburbs, where you’re more likely to find gardens and car-parking space.

Most flats include basic equipment such as an oven, dishwasher, washing machine and clothes dryer. You and your flatmates will share the cost of rent and usually the phone and energy bills.


Accommodation costs



The cost of accommodation will vary depending on how you want to live. The national median rent for a three bedroom house was NZ$340 per week in March 2013, just over NZ$110 a room per week.

Cost Of living

New Zealand’s flexible education system has study options to suit every budget. The cost of living is similar to other OECD countries, and is teamed with an excellent work/life balance and a high quality of life.

As part of your student visa application, you must provide evidence that you can cover your living expenses while studying in New Zealand. If you’re studying in New Zealand on a scholarship or a sponsor/family member has agreed to accept financial responsibility for you while you’re here, you may not be required to show proof of funds.


If you will be studying in New Zealand for more than one year, you‘ll need to prove that you have at least $15,000 to support yourself for the first year. If you’re studying for less than a year, you must have at least $1250 for each month of study to contribute to your living expenses.

Living costs will depend on your lifestyle and which part of the country you live in. Some costs vary by region. For example, you may need to travel more in the main centres, and transport costs may be more expensive than in your home country.

As an example of how much to budget for, Victoria University recommends that students allow between $18,000-$27,000 each year, the University of Auckland recommends $20,000-$25,000, the University of Otago recommends $15,000-$17,000 and Massey University recommends $15,000- $18,000.

You may be able to offset some of your costs by working. Most student visas enable you to work up to 20 hours per week, or full-time in the holidays.

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